Archive for February, 2010

Stanley surnames in the 1911 census.

Posted by on Friday, 12 February, 2010

The map below will show the distribution of the Stanley surname as it appears in the 1911 census.

The Connaught counties are listed as follows:
The County Galway Stanleys are listed here.
The County Mayo Stanleys are listed here.
The County Roscommon Stanleys are listed here.
The County Sligo Stanleys are listed here.
There are no Stanleys listed for County Leitrim.

The Leinster counties are listed as follows:
The County Kildare Stanleys are listed here.
The County Kilkenny Stanleys are listed here.

The Munster counties are listed as follows:
The County Clare Stanleys are listed here.
The County Cork Stanleys are listed here.
The County Kerry Stanleys are listed here.
The County Limerick Stanleys are listed here.
The County Tipperary Stanleys are listed here.
The County Waterford Stanleys are listed here.

The Ulster counties are listed as follows:
The County Antrim Stanleys are mainly concentrated in Belfast. A full list of names for them with links to the census can be found here.
The County Armagh Stanleys are listed here.
The County Cavan Stanleys are listed here.
The County Donegal Stanleys are listed here.
The County Down Stanleys are listed here.
The County Londonderry Stanleys are listed here.
The County Monaghan Stanleys are listed here.
There are no Stanleys listed for counties Fermanagh and Tyrone.


Letitia Sophia Stanley 1870-1946, Gravestone Inscription

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

Letitia Sophia Stanley
Born 6th 11th Month 1870
Called Home 7th 3rd Month 1946.

Mona Wylie ‘The burial ground of Grange Meeting: Gravestone Inscriptions’.
Duiche Neill: Journal of the O’Neill Country Historical Society, No. 13, 2000, page 207.

Mary Ann Stanley, 1801-1881

Posted by on Monday, 8 February, 2010

Mary Ann, the only child of Sir Edmond & Jane Talbot, was born 24 Oct. 1801.  Died 7 Jan. 1881.

Mary Ann was born in Ireland some 15 years after her parents were married. Edmond was 44.  She had quite an interesting life travelling to far off places with her parents.  Her mother & herself spent 5 months travelling home, perhaps for some more advanced schooling with her rapidly approaching status as a young lady of quality.

This event must have been tarnished somewhat by her elopement & marriage of 1815 to a widower 16 years her senior. His name was Edward Trant Bontein, Army Captain, b: 1785 in Balglas, Scotland. She was not quite 14 years of age. There were no objections to the match but those which arose from her extreme youth.

Her first son Edward was born Jan 1818 & was only 4 months old when the family all sailed for Madras to join Sir Edmond. Just under a year later in Sept. 1819 she gave birth to her second son James.  Only two months later her husband died while in service at the age of 34. She was only 18 at the time.  The family stayed in Madras, leaving in 1824.

Little is known of her life thereafter except that towards the end of her father’s life, her mother having already died, she was living with him at Richmond. By this time her sons surnames had been changed to Stanley by Royal License, registered at the College of Arms. Mary Ann referred to herself as Mrs. Bontain Stanley. It was the condition of Sir Edmond’s Will that she should take back the name Stanley & pass it on to her sons.  Interestingly she had the full support of Sir James Bontain, her father-in-law. She lived most of her life in rather elevated circles in Brussels where she moved & is buried.

The late Mrs. Bontein Stanley was very much respected by all indicated by the large number who assembled at her house afterwards joined in the funeral service in the English Church Rue Belliard. It was quite evident that all present were deeply affected on bidding a final farewell to one who had been such a universal favourite & whose generous efforts in the cause of charity will long be remembered.

Further information on Edmond Stanley can be found at: http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=413″

Sir Edmond Stanley, 1761-1843

Posted by on Monday, 8 February, 2010

Sir Edmond was baptized 1761.  Died April 1843, aged 82 years at Richmond, Surrey.   Member of Parliament for Ireland & Chief Justice of Madras in India. He was the son of James of Low Park, Roscommon & Jane, daughter of Edmond Kelly of Mt. Gray.  His estates & residence at Sackville St. Dublin & Richmond.

Edmond qualified as a Barrister & in 1786 married Jane, daughter of Rev. John Talbot.  However she spent most of her youth with her grandmother at Mt. Talbot, Roscommon.  Mt. Talbot was still standing in 1974 but without a roof. The Church at the gate was locked & the church yard with Talbot graves was derelict.

In 1798 Edmond was under a special commission to Cork to preside at the trials there & received the thanks of the country of the Gov. for his conduct on that occasion. At Madras he introduced many useful reforms into the Registrars Office & in 1820 was promoted to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Edmond’s successful career in the Irish Parliament came to an end with the Union of Ireland with England & the resulting end of home rule. He sold Low Park & bought property at Roscrowther in Pembroke which included a coal mine. They went to live in London where he would seek another job. It was in 1807 that he received an appointment to the East India Company.  He rose to the post of Chief Justice of Madras & retired in 1825 at the age of 64.

Edmond & Lucy had only one child, Mary Ann, born in 1801.  There is much more to his life story but too long to continue.

Further information on their daughter Mary Ann Stanley can be found at: http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=415″

Edward Stanley of Athlone

Posted by on Monday, 8 February, 2010

Searching for an Edward Stanley, birth u/k, residing at Athlone.  Wife is Eliz. Adamson.  Was town bailiff  in 1787.  Two daughters Margaret & Catherine.  Also an unnamed child baptized at St. Mary’s C of I in 1786.

Marilyn

The Ouzel Galley Society 1705-1888

Posted by on Sunday, 7 February, 2010

The Ouzel Galley Society had its origins in a dramatic incident in Irish shipping history. The Ouzel, a trader ship was sent in 1695 to the coasts of Smyrna and the Levant by the firm of Ferris, Twigg and Cash. The ship had an Irish crew and was captained by Captain Eoghan Massey.

When the ship failed to return and three years had passed without any word, it was presumed lost and the owners claimed and were paid the insurance money. Some time later the ship returned with tales of being boarded by Moorish seamen in the Bay of Biscay and then falling into the hands of Algerian pirates who used her in their trade. The Irish crew were kept aboard ship and eventually managed to escape with the ship and the spoils, which greatly exceeded the value of the original cargo.

The merchants, Ferris, Twigg and Cash claimed the new cargo and offered to refund the insurance. The insurers disagreed and the matter was brought to the Courts was settled by arbitration by a committee of merchants. The arbitration was successful and met with such approval that the committee formed itself into the Ouzel Galley Society in 1705, with the aim of arbitrating in all disputes referred to them relating to trade and commerce. Fees were charged, and these were used to provide benefits for ‘decayed’ merchants.

The Society was a success but over time became more of a social club than an arbitrator, in 1869 important matters were still being dealt with by the society. However in 1888 with the growing complexities of commercial law the Society was voluntarily wound up by the Order of the Court of Chancery, and its assets were distributed among charitable associations.

F.G. Hall, ‘The Bank of Ireland 1783-1946‘
Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co Ltd, 1949, pages 478 & 479.

Arthur Stanley, Director and Governor of the Bank of Ireland (1786-1808)

Posted by on Saturday, 6 February, 2010

Arthur Stanley was one of the original subscribers to the capital of the Bank of Ireland in 1783-1784, subscribing £2,000.

He was a director of the bank in the years 1786, 1788, 1790, 1792, 1794 and 1796-1807. He then became governor of the bank from 1807-1808. He was a member of the firm of Arthur Stanley & Co, formerly Westlake & Stanley, drug merchants of 4 Bride Street, successors of Patrick Bride. The Stanleys, originally Hanleys, came from farming stock in Westmeath.

F.G. Hall, ‘The Bank of Ireland 1783-1946
Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co Ltd, 1949, pages 505 & 509.

Further information on Arthur can be found at: http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=218″
Some information on Arthur Stanley’s son Edward can be found at: http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=330″

Edward Stanley; Vicar, 1801; Prebendary, 1806.

Posted by on Saturday, 6 February, 2010

Vicars of the Parish of Errigal Trough in the Diocese of Clogher and in counties Monaghan and Tyrone.

1801 – Edward Stanley was collated on December 18, 1801 (Diocesan Register); he resigned on May 9, 1806 to become Prebendary of Tyholland.

Prebendaries of the Parish of Tyholland (or Tehallen) in the Diocese of Clogher and in Co. Monaghan.

1806 – Edward Stanley was collated on May 9, 1806, (First Fruit Returns). He was the eldest son of Arthur Stanley, Pharmacopola [Chemist] of Dublin. He was born in Dublin and educated by Dr Norris of Drogheda. He entered Trinity College Dublin on October 29, 1788 at the age of 16 and graduated with a B.A. in 1792 and a M.A. in 1806. He was Vicar of Errigletrough from 1801-1806. He died intestate on April 14, 1822 at the age of 40. (Mont. in Tehallen). His wife Charlotte was granted administration of his estate in 1822, she died on October 10 1829 at the age of 57.

Rev. James B. Leslie ‘Clogher Clergy and Parishes: being an account of the clergy of the Church of Ireland in the diocese of Clogher, from the earliest period, with historical notices of the several parishes, churches etc‘.
Enniskillen: Fermanagh Times, 1929, pages 87 & 195.

Some information on Edward Stanley’s father Arthur can be found at: http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=337″

Nicholas de Staneley, Presbyter, 1310

Posted by on Saturday, 6 February, 2010

Rectors of Heynestown Parish in Co. Louth, formerly known as Felda.

1310 – Nicholas de Staneley presbyter to the church of “la Felde” in the Diocese of Armagh, in the kings gift by voidance of the Archbishopric, December 10, 1310.
(Patent Rolls of England).

Rev. James B. Leslie ‘Armagh Clergy and Parishes: being an account of the clergy of the Church of Ireland in the diocese of Armagh, from the earliest period, with historical notices of the several parishes, churches etc‘.
Dundalk: William Tempest, 1911, page 308.

Edward John Theodore Stanley, Curate, 1904

Posted by on Friday, 5 February, 2010

Curates of Willowfield Parish, Co. Down.

Edward John Theodore Stanley was licensed curate in December 19, 1904. (Diocesan Register of Down and Dromore). He attended Trinity College Dublin, graduating with a B.A. in 1903, receiving his Divinity Testimonium (2) in 1903. He was ordained deacon in 1903 in Ossory for Down, ordained a priest for Down in 1904; he was curate for Willowfield from 1903 to 1906. He was a Church Missionary Society (C.M.S.) Missionary in China from 1906 to 1920. Then curate at All Saints, Shooter’s Hill from 1920 to 1923, followed by Vicar in Christ Church, Dover in 1923.

See also http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=628
See also http://www.thebrassbuddha.net/stanley/?p=839

J.B. Leslie and H.R. Swanzy ‘Biographical succession lists of the clergy of diocese of Down
Enniskillen: Fermanagh Times, 1936, page 167.